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Oregon State Legislature Anniversary of Statehood

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Oregon's 162nd Birthday and Anniversary of Statehood

 
We’d first like to acknowledge the many tribes and bands who call Oregon their ancestral territory and honor the ongoing relationship between the land, plants, animals and people indigenous to this place we now call Oregon. We recognize the continued sovereignty of the nine federally recognized tribes who have ties to this place and thank them for continuing to teach us how we might all be here together.​ Some of our tribes have joined our annual event recognizing the anniversary of Oregon's statehood. ​​We are pleased to recognize our other cultural and heritage partners that have provided activities and learning opportunities for the public since we started our annual event in 2015. Please explore the links to these partners, and enjoy the activities provided for you below. Thank you to our presenting sponsor, the Oregon State Capitol Foundation​ for their continued support of this programming. 
 

Thank you to our Birthday and Anniversary of Statehood Partners!

American Imaginations, Interpreters
Anvil Academy
Aurora Colony
Brooks Historical Society
Capitol Community Media
Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde
Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw
Confederated Tribes of Siletz
Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
Coquille Indian Tribe​
Curtis Heritage Education Center
Deepwood Museum and Gardens
End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center
Fred Meyer
Friends of Pioneer Cemetery
GeerCrest Farm
Gilbert House Children's Museum
Girl Scouts
Klamath Tribes
Mt. Hood Territory​
McLoughlin Memorial Association​
Old Time Fiddlers Association
Oregon Black Pioneers
Oregon Department of Education​

Oregon Parks and Recreation, Champoeg State Heritage Area
Oregon Parks and Recreation, Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
Oregon State Capitol Foundation​
Philip Foster Farm
Polk County Historical Society
Salem Multicultural Institute and Worldbeat Festival
Willamette Agate and Mineral Society
Willamette Heritage Center
Willamette Valley Genealogical Society
Yamhill County Historical Society

End-of-the-Oregon-Trail-Historic-Oregon-City.png FRE​E FILM!​

The End of the Oregon Trail in Oregon City has produced a brand new interpretive short film of the Oregon Trail, titled "That Long Looked-For Place." Usually the film is behind a paywall and available to watch for a $10 donation to the interpretive center, but through February 14, we are offering it for free! Just click the link below. Enjoy!

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DID YOU KNOW?

​​​Our friends at the Oregon Historical Society compile entries into the Oregon Encyclopedia so we can learn more about our state using vetted historical resources. They have started a list of STATE SYMBOLS​ here, going until 2011. Since 2011 we have added more symbols to the list, including State Dog, State Raptor, and State Pie. Do you know what they are? 

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FREE ACTIVITY BOOK

This fun birthday activity comes to us from our partners at Oregon's Mt. Hood Territory. Usually we hand out this fun activity guide during our live event, but since we can't this year, please visit https://www.mthoodterritory.com/oregon-trail-activity-book and download your free copy!​​


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FREE DOWNLOADABLE
OREGON CONSTITUTION

After raising funds to restore the original Oregon Constitution (cover photo above) the Oregon State Archives Division scanned and made available every page of the vital document. You can see the handwritten document here​ and download it for free if you'd like. If you are into a more readable version (typewritten) with all its current amendments, you can download that here. 

​GeerC​rest Farm

​The following videos tell the story of the development of Oregon through the eyes of three notable members of the Geer family: T.T. Geer, the first governor of Oregon to have been born here; Homer Davenport, a country boy who became a political cartoonist for the Hearst newspaper empire; and Musa Geer, who quietyly worked to heal the rift between the white settlers and Native Americans on the wind-swept hills above the Columbia River. 

 


 


​Oregon Black Pioneers

​​A 5-minute short film regarding the history of African Americans in the Oregon Territory and Willamette Valley. 

 

Our vision is to become the preeminent resource for the study of Oregon’s African American history and culture. We work to achieve this vision through our illuminating exhibitions, our public programs, our original publications, and historical research. Additionally, we partner with local organizations to plan, interpret, and advocate for the preservation and commemoration of sites with African American historical significance.​ ​Our website​

Friends of Pioneer Cemetery

​Celebrating a Century of Woman Suffrage under the Nineteenth Amendment and Suffrage Activists at Rest in Salem Pioneer Cemetery. 

 

​Friends of Pioneer Cemetery was organized in 1985 to promote maintenance and restoration efforts within Salem's historic Odd Fellows Rural Cemetery, founded in 1854. The Friends also work to promote awareness of the cemetery as a resource for community history by staging periodic educational programs for the public. Learn more here. ​

​Yamhill Valley Historical Society

Watch the videos below to learn "How to climb into a covered wagon with a long skirt," and view a retrospective of activities held at the Yamhill Valley Historical Society Museum in McMinnville in celebration of statehood day!

 


 

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Activity!

Download and print this black and white copy of the state seal. Color it!

Turn the page over. If you were asked to create a state seal for Oregon what would it look like? Draw and color it. You can take a photo and upload it to the comments section if you'd like.

While coloring the state seal, ask yourself some questions about the symbolism. What does the eagle represent? Why are there 33 stars? What does 1859 mean? Why are there two ships?

Now visit https://sos.oregon.gov/blue.../Pages/explore/focus-seal.aspx to learn more about the state seal of Oregon.​

100yearsimage v2.jpg​Thank you for joining us for this year's online birthday celebration and anniversary of statehood event. Please join us next year on February 12 as we celebrate statehood day as well as Oregon State Parks Centennial! It will be a bash you don't want to miss!

​Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde

 

The story of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde is the story of persistence. It is a story that has evolved from the forced removal of our ancestors during the treaty years, the struggle of reservation life, our termination by the federal government and our fight for recognition. It is the story of a community, a Tribe, and a culture that has persisted despite the challenges. We hope that you will take some time to learn more here​. 

​​Confederated Tribes of the Siletz

 

Mission: Continue forever, with the help of God, our unique identity as Indians and as the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon, and to protect that identity from forces that threaten to diminish it. Learn more about us here​.

Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians

The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians are made up of 3 tribes (4 Bands): 2 bands of Coos Tribes: Hanis Coos (Coos Proper), Miluk Coos; Lower Umpqua Tribe; and Siuslaw Tribe. Although both Coos bands lived in close proximity to one another on the Coos River tributaries, they spoke different dialects of the Coos language and had their own unique history and cultural differences. A days walk north from the Coos River, you found yourself in the Lower Umpqua territory with a much different spoken language that both the Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw bands shared; the Siuslaw language. The diversity of languages and cultures you can find along the West Coast attests to the longevity these bands sustained for hundreds of generations in the lands they call home.​Learn more about us here


​Coquille Indian Tribe

When Coquille Indian people travel southwestern Oregon’s coastline and interior, we trace the footsteps of generations too numerous to count. Our ancestors were here when Rome rose and fell. They were here when Stonehenge and the pyramids were built, and when the last mammoths and saber-toothed cats walked the earth.​ 
Our stories tell us that our people have lived in this place since time began. Archaeologists have found evidence of human occupation dating back at least 14,000 years. This long history binds us forever to the lands and waters of southwestern Oregon.​ ​Learn more about us here.  

Klamath Tribes

The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians are made up of 3 tribes (4 Bands): 2 bands of Coos Tribes: Hanis Coos (Coos Proper), Miluk Coos; Lower Umpqua Tribe; and Siuslaw Tribe. Although both Coos bands lived in close proximity to one another on the Coos River tributaries, they spoke different dialects of the Coos language and had their own unique history and cultural differences. A days walk north from the Coos River, you found yourself in the Lower Umpqua territory with a much different spoken language that both the Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw bands shared; the Siuslaw language. The diversity of languages and cultures you can find along the West Coast attests to the longevity these bands sustained for hundreds of generations in the lands they call home.​ Learn more about us here


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